Why should you eat collagen?

Collagen is an essential part of our skin, hair and nails. As we age the production of collagen declines at a speed of about 1% each year. A reduction in collagen production leads to older looking skin. Wrinkles start to show and our skin becomes saggy and less firm. Also, our hair becomes less shiny and our nails more brittle.

You should eat collagen in order to keep your skin youthful, your hair shiny and your nails strong.

What does science say about collagen?

Several scientific studies have researched the benefits of collagen in your diet. While many studies found that collagen added to skin care products is hardly beneficial, as the collagen molecules are too large to penetrate the outer layers of the skin, other studies found that including collagen into your diet has several health benefits.

We believe in scientifically backed up nutritional supplements. Therefore, we will do our best to constantly update this side and inform you about the latest research about skincare.

We already put a few together, take a look:

Papers about skin health:

(1) Koyama. Effects of collagen peptide ingestion on the skin. Shokuhin-To-Kaihatsu 44:10-12 (2009) (in Japanese)

(2) Proksch, E., Schunck, M., Zague, V., Segger, D., Degwert, J. and Oesser, S. (2014). Oral intake of specific bioactive collagen peptides reduces skin wrinkles and increases dermal matrix synthesis. Skin Pharmacol. Physiol., Vol 27, Iss. 3, 113-119.

(3) Sumida E et al., The effect of oral ingestion of collagen peptide on skin hydration and biochemical data of blood. J Nutr Food 7:45-52 (2004)

(4) V. Zague. (2008). A new view concerning the effects of collagen hdyrolysate intake on skin properties. Arch Dermatol Res.

(5) V. Zague, V. de Freitas, M. da Cosat Rosa, G. Alvares de Castro, R. G. Jaeger, G. M.Machado-Santelli. 2010. Collagen Hydrolysate Intake Increases Skin Collagen Expression and Suppresses Matrix Mettaloproteinase 2 Activity

Papers about nail health:

(1) MD, T. L. T., 1950. The Effect of Gelatin on Fragile Finger Nails. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 14(5), pp. 323-325.

(2) Rosenberg S et al., Further studies in the use of gelatin in the treatment of brittle nails. Arch Dermat & Syph
76:330-335

Papers about hair health:

(1) Scala J et al., Effect of daily gelatine ingestion on human scalp hair. Nutr Rep Int 13:579-592

Papers about joint & bone health

(1) Dubourg,G.,(2013).Targeting bone health. The world of food ingredients, February 2013.

(2) Kim, H.K., Kim, M.G. and Leem, K.H. (2013). Osteogenic activity of collagen peptide via ERK/MAPK pathway mediated boosting of collagen synthesis and its therapeutic efficacy in osteoporotic bone by back-scattered electron imaging and microarchitecture analysis. Molecules, Vol. 18, 15474-15489.

(3) Leem, K.H., Lee, S., Jang, A. and Kim, H.K. (2013). Porcine skin gelatin hydrolysate promotes longitudinal bone growth in adolescent rats. Journal of Medicinal Food, Vol. 16, Iss. 5, 447-453.